BlueMusings

poutysoldier:

Steve’s first shield was neither the shield he had before he saved the 107th, nor was it the vibranium shield we’ve all become accustomed to. 

Steve’s first shield was Bucky. 

patrickat:

50 Shades is to the kink community what Sharknado was to meteorology.

0bstacles:

huffingtonpost:

THIS GENIUS MACHINE FEEDS STRAY DOGS IN EXCHANGE FOR RECYCLED BOTTLES

The Turkish company Pugedon has created a vending machine that’s dispensing help for both the environment and our furry friends.

Watch the machine in action here.

this makes me so happy

Women invented all the core technologies that made civilization possible. This isn’t some feminist myth; it’s what modern anthropologists believe. Women are thought to have invented pottery, basketmaking, weaving, textiles, horticulture, and agriculture. That’s right: without women’s inventions, we wouldn’t be able to carry things or store things or tie things up or go fishing or hunt with nets or haft a blade or wear clothes or grow our food or live in permanent settlements. Suck on that.

Women have continued to be involved in the creation and advancement of civilization throughout history, whether you know it or not. Pick anything—a technology, a science, an art form, a school of thought—and start digging into the background. You’ll find women there, I guarantee, making critical contributions and often inventing the damn shit in the first place.

Women have made those contributions in spite of astonishing hurdles. Hurdles like not being allowed to go to school. Hurdles like not being allowed to work in an office with men, or join a professional society, or walk on the street, or own property. Example: look up Lise Meitner some time. When she was born in 1878 it was illegal in Austria for girls to attend school past the age of 13. Once the laws finally eased up and she could go to university, she wasn’t allowed to study with the men. Then she got a research post but wasn’t allowed to use the lab on account of girl cooties. Her whole life was like this, but she still managed to discover nuclear fucking fission. Then the Nobel committee gave the prize to her junior male colleague and ignored her existence completely.

Men in all patriarchal civilizations, including ours, have worked to downplay or deny women’s creative contributions. That’s because patriarchy is founded on the belief that women are breeding stock and men are the only people who can think. The easiest way for men to erase women’s contributions is to simply ignore that they happened. Because when you ignore something, it gets forgotten. People in the next generation don’t hear about it, and so they grow up thinking that no women have ever done anything. And then when women in their generation do stuff, they think ‘it’s a fluke, never happened before in the history of the world, ignore it.’ And so they ignore it, and it gets forgotten. And on and on and on. The New York Times article is a perfect illustration of this principle in action.

Finally, and this is important: even those women who weren’t inventors and intellectuals, even those women who really did spend all their lives doing stereotypical “women’s work”—they also built this world. The mundane labor of life is what makes everything else possible. Before you can have scientists and engineers and artists, you have to have a whole bunch of people (and it’s usually women) to hold down the basics: to grow and harvest and cook the food, to provide clothes and shelter, to fetch the firewood and the water, to nurture and nurse, to tend and teach. Every single scrap of civilized inventing and dreaming and thinking rides on top of that foundation. Never forget that.

Violet Socks, Patriarchy in Action: The New York Times Rewrites History (via o1sv)

Reblogging again for that paragraph because that is the part we forget the most.

(via girlwiki)

Did you know?

stfusexists:

everyjoyitbrings:

collectivecrack:

White American males constitute only 33% of the population. Yet, they occupy approximately:

  • 80% of tenured positions in higher education
  • 80% of the House of Representatives
  • 80-85% of the U.S. Senate
  • 92%of Forbes 400 executive CEO-level positions
  • 90% of athletic team owners
  • 97.7% of U.S. presidents

Good thing we solved sexism and racism u guise

"Believing that you are unworthy of love and belonging or that who you are authentically is a sin or is wrong, is deadly." - It Got Better featuring Laverne Cox (x)

This reminds me of my favorite line from one of my favorite poems, “Wild Geese” by Mary Oliver

"just let the soft animal of your body love what it loves."

No writing is wasted. Did you know that sourdough from San Francisco is leavened partly by a bacteria called lactobacillus sanfrancisensis? It is native to the soil there, and does not do well elsewhere. But any kitchen can become an ecosystem. If you bake a lot, your kitchen will become a happy home to wild yeasts, and all your bread will taste better. Even a failed loaf is not wasted. Likewise, cheese makers wash the dairy floor with whey. Tomato gardeners compost with rotten tomatoes. No writing is wasted: the words you can’t put in your book can wash the floor, live in the soil, lurk around in the air. They will make the next words better.

Erin Bow (via writersrelief)

LOVE. THIS.

(via kyrafic)

This is a collection of 7 of my short stories, that range from SF to fantasy to urban fantasy to magical realism. You can find it for .99 in all the usual ebook sales venues, but you can also get it for free for signing up for my occasional newsletter. (It’s always a newsletter; it just gets sent out occasionally. Maybe 6-8 times a year, and typically with some new short fiction for your reading pleasure.)
It’s an opt-in, no spam ever list and you can sign up here: http://www.ljcohen.net/contact.html
And I purchased the rights to use this amazing cover art. The artist is Veris Maya, who I discovered on Deviant Art. 

This is a collection of 7 of my short stories, that range from SF to fantasy to urban fantasy to magical realism. You can find it for .99 in all the usual ebook sales venues, but you can also get it for free for signing up for my occasional newsletter. (It’s always a newsletter; it just gets sent out occasionally. Maybe 6-8 times a year, and typically with some new short fiction for your reading pleasure.)

It’s an opt-in, no spam ever list and you can sign up here: http://www.ljcohen.net/contact.html

And I purchased the rights to use this amazing cover art. The artist is Veris Maya, who I discovered on Deviant Art. 

markruffalo:

Detroit Water and Sewerage Department put a halt to the 15-day water shut off that left thousands of families without water! SUCCESS! But the fight isn’t over. 

Our friends from Windsor stand with us in declaring water a human right. They are bringing water across the border to support Detroiters, who have had their water shut off.Meet at the Spirit of Detroit statue in front of the Coleman A. Young Center at Woodward and Jefferson at 4pm. Rally with Detroit People’s Water Board & the Council of Canadians. Speakers include international water activist, Maude Barlow, and the director of Michigan Welfare Rights Organization, Maureen Taylor.After the convoy arrives at the Spirit of Detroit, join the caravan as water is delivered to the People’s Water Station at St. Peter’s Church.
Click here for more details.

markruffalo:

Detroit Water and Sewerage Department put a halt to the 15-day water shut off that left thousands of families without water! SUCCESS! But the fight isn’t over. 

Our friends from Windsor stand with us in declaring water a human right. They are bringing water across the border to support Detroiters, who have had their water shut off.

Meet at the Spirit of Detroit statue in front of the Coleman A. Young Center at Woodward and Jefferson at 4pm. 

Rally with Detroit People’s Water Board & the Council of Canadians. Speakers include international water activist, Maude Barlow, and the director of Michigan Welfare Rights Organization, Maureen Taylor.

After the convoy arrives at the Spirit of Detroit, join the caravan as water is delivered to the People’s Water Station at St. Peter’s Church.

Click here for more details.